Day Twenty-Five

6

My first day at my internship/stage went well.  I’m helping out (unpaid) a few days a week at a fancy-schmancy modern Asian restaurant with some of the pastry work.  I think I might be making some of the butters and cheeses, too.  It’s a pretty great opportunity for me; I’m thankful to be getting some pastry experience.  The chefs at the restaurant have been really flexible about what hours I work (around school), which I appreciate. 

The only problem: I don’t know very much about Asian desserts.  Are there any blogs or cookbooks you recommend?  This is what I know about Asian desserts: mochi, stuff made with red bean paste, lychee, and…. help.

So anyway, let’s talk about Friday.  Friday was our last day of plated desserts.  We made chiboust again, just for practice.  The picture above the meringue about to be folded into the gelatinized pastry cream.  I made a mistake.  Do you see what I did?  I poured the hot sugar syrup into the mixer bowl, right onto the whisk, so then the syrup splattered and stuck on to the sides of the bowl.  My chiboust lacked strength because of the loss of sugar.  But now you can bet I’ll never do that again; lesson learned. 

Now we’re going to talk about my least favorite dessert we’ve made so far…. and the worst plating of a dessert I’ve made so far.  This first plating I actually worked hard on, but then ended up hating it.  So then I threw together this because we were running out of time.

This dessert didn’t do it for me, but that’s only my personal preference.  A lot of people in my class enjoyed this.  It’s chocolate streusel, chocolate pastry cream, lemon curd, lemon gellee, and earl grey tea ice cream. 

4

I’m not on the lemon-chocolate bandwagon, and I never will be. 

Another dessert we plated was an almond infused panna cotta, with berry water and a citrus tuile.  I liked this one quite a bit; it was light and refreshing.  It almost tasted healthy as long as you didn’t think about the heavy cream in it. 

5

We ran out of time and didn’t get to make jellies and preserves.  I think we might have some extra time this week to make them.  This week we're taking our first written and practical exams.  Ahhh!

22 comments:

  1. Bang Bang Pie? Hahaha I love the name :D

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  2. I would try looking at White on Rice Couple's blog. I'm not sure how many desserts they do. And.. maybe try Kirby's Cravings. A lot of asian influence there. Good luck!

    By the way, I'm not on the chocolate/lemon bandwagon either.

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    1. Oh okay, sounds great! I've never really read White on Rice before.

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  3. Good luck at the restaurant. My favorite Asian restaurant's signature dessert is coconut cream pie, but I'm not sure that's particularly Asian. The waffle looks soooo good. Now I'm craving waffles.

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  4. I stumbled across that Belgian Bakery by accident this past weekend! I had the chocolate cherry croissant and it was out of this world! I'll definitely be back for more. When I get brave enough to attempt making croissants at home I may try stuffing some with chocolate and cherries :)

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  5. Yay Hendrickx's! I have been wanting to go to Bang Bang Pie Shop forevvvva! I heard their biscuits were amazing, too.

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  6. Those croissants look amazing. I'm not so sure about that chocolate lemon thing. I've heard about it recently and can't really bring myself to get excited about it. Your panna cotta was lovely though. :-)

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    1. Thank you! I don't think those flavors go together. They're both too strong.

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  7. YAY, a shout-out! xoxo. so fun hanging out with you :) i'll send you my liege waffle recipe. and i totally agree about lemon + chocolate together, especially when it's something as tart as curd. as for Asian desserts, Michael thinks it is absolutely nuts that BEANS are considered a dessert. We grew up eating fruit for dessert, plus all kinds of pudding-y desserts with coconut milk, tapioca, ginger, sesame, etc. This is definitely more deli/street-foodie and the fancy Asian restaurants are usually a fusion of French desserts with Asian ingredients. Can't wait to see what you make!

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    1. I know! Thanks for coming to Chicago to see me! :) I would like that recipe. I'm not sure when I'll have time to get around to making them. Okay, okay. I feel better about not liking that dessert. It is nuts that beans are considered dessert!

      I love pudding-y desserts. Love coconut and tapioca. Yes, I think this restaurant is French/Asian fusion. It has a lot of Korean influence.

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  8. Wow how exciting to be working in an asian restaurant and on the desserts ....amazing! The only asian things I know are black sesame, red bean paste, tarro root, green tea, coconut, ginger and sticky rice. Your desserts and plating style are so professional now, I'm in awe.

    Do you find your perception of bakery offerings has changed since starting your course? Can you spot the genuine fresh ones to the not so good ones now?

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    1. Ohhh thank you. I'm feeling really crappy about my dessert presentations. Tarro root! Good one.

      I think school has definitely changed my opinions of bakeries. I think I know now what has more work and detail put into it.

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  9. I love following your posts about pastry school! All the desserts you have made look absolutely gorgeous - thanks for sharing and you sound like you're having a blast!

    As for the Asian place you'll be working at - perhaps you can specify which Asian country/ies the restaurant is drawing its influence from? There are lots of Asian countries! And, as such, Asian food is incredibly diverse, each country drawing from very different ingredients. I can point you to two awesome Malaysian blogs I follow which have dessert recipes in there as well: http://rasamalaysia.com/ and http://lilyng2000.blogspot.com. Malaysian food draws strongly from Chinese and Indian food, but also has its own unique Malaysian cuisine.

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    1. Thanks for reading, Beaniebum!

      Yes, you're absolutely right. I should have mentioned that this restaurant has strong Korean influence. Do you know anything about Korean desserts? I haven't had a chance to get to the library and research this week.

      I will check out rasamalaysia. That's a popular blog! I've stumbled across it a couple of times. I will check out lilyn2000, too. Thanks for the recommendations!

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  10. Good luck at the restaurant!! So exciting!

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  11. Hi Emily -- I have to tell you it's so impressive that you're doing all these things and managing to blog too. Your readers really appreciate it!

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  12. Hi Emily! Can't tell you how many times I have done the same thing with the sugar syrup and the egg whites. I'm old so you would think I would have figured it out by now?? I can ask the Filipinos I work with about their desserts. I have had a few of them-they are not as sweet as what I usually call dessert. Some sponge and chiffon types of cake topped with meringue is what I can recall. Alot of the sweets I have had from Japan and Okinawa are based on not only bean paste but other roots(like sweet potatoes), and floral flavors, along with green tea. The "junk food" is not as junkie as what we eat. Sometimes I didn't even know what it really was, but none of it tasted bad, just natural, usually fruity. I will ask around at work! They love to eat! Enjoy reading here. Keep up the good work. Joan

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  13. An internship! Wow. have I told you how jealous I am? How come the school lets you post such detailed write-ups of their structure though? Doesn't it harm their 'uniqueness' and elite quality?

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Sup?